Give a Gift to UCF
Follow Us
COHPA Facebook
COHPA Twitter
COHPA RSS
COHPA YouTube

Quick Facts

 

ATHLETIC TRAINING
100% - First-time pass rate on the certification exam by 2013 graduates
PRE-CLINICAL
3rd - Ranking among the 10 most popular majors at UCF (UCF Today, Winter 2011 issue)
PHYSICAL THERAPY
7 - Ranking in "100 Best Jobs" by U.S. News & World Report in 2014

3.62 - Average prerequisite GPAs of the admitted Class of 2016

 

3.69 - Average GPAs of last 60 undergraduate credit hours of the admitted Class of 2016

156 - Average Quantitative GRE score of admitted Class of 2016

154 - Average Verbal GRE score of admitted Class of 20166

100% - Percent of graduating students from the DPT Program from Class of 2010 thru Class of 2013 that passed the national licensure exam (national average was 88-93%)

100% - Percent of graduating students from the DPT Program from Class of 2010 thru Class of 2013 who were employed as physical therapists within 6 months of licensure

Physical Therapy

 

The Doctor of Physical Therapy program at UCF will participate in the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service, known as PTCAS, beginning in July 2014. Applicants applying to the entry-level physical therapist education program for the 2015 entering class will apply online using the PTCAS application. To learn more about the PTCAS application process, visit www.ptcas.org.


OVERVIEW OF THE PROGRAM

The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program educates students to become competent, compassionate, and ethical practitioners in a variety of health care settings. Graduates will be highly dedicated professionals with excellent patient care, communication, critical thinking, patient education and advocacy, management and research skills.

The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) Program is a full-time professional doctoral program requiring completion of 112 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree. The course work is taken in a prescribed sequence over nine semesters as provided here and all course work is required. The program requires a total of 34 weeks of full-time clinical training. During the clinical affiliations, students work under the direct supervision of a licensed physical therapist.

ACCREDITATION

The Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at the University of Central Florida is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314; telephone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org; website: http://www.capteonline.org

 

MISSION, VISION, GOALS, aND BELIEFS

Our Mission:

 

The mission of the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at the University of Central Florida is to educate students to be compassionate, competent, confident, and able to practice in a variety of healthcare settings.  The graduates will be highly dedicated professionals with excellent ability in patient skills, communication, critical thinking, patient education and advocacy, management and research.  They will be life-long learners and ethical practitioners.

 

Our Vision:

The Doctor of Physical Therapy program at the University of Central Florida, through its collaborative efforts, will be distinguished for:

  • The quality of our students, our faculty, and our commitment to the program and to the profession. 
  • Being a major intellectual resource for the community and as a role model in all areas of the profession for our students.
  • Fostering a climate in which creativity and innovation flourish and enrich our involvement in scholarship, service, and teaching. 
  • Faculty that are actively involved participants, dedicated to the quality of life in the Central Florida community, and responsive to the needs of the University, our diverse student body, and the Central Florida community.
  • Graduates who are leaders in the profession, in the community, the state, and on a national front.

                                                                                         

 Our Goals:

  • To prepare Physical Therapists who are committed to their profession through active participation in their communities, and their advocacy for patients.
  • To meet the needs of the changing healthcare environment, and to provide quality physical therapy education for students at the University of Central Florida. The work of faculty encompasses teaching, practice, research and service activities to accomplish this goal. 
  • To inspire physical therapy students throughout their education process at UCF of the value of multidisciplinary collaboration by encouraging interdepartmental relationships and relationships with the community in education, research and service activities. 
  • To serve students who are diverse in age, ethnic and racial identity and socioeconomic background. 
  • To foster an environment of creativity and innovation by using state-of-the–art technology.

 

Our Beliefs:

  • We believe that membership in the APTA enhances professional development and that promoting membership should begin during entry-level physical therapy education. 
  • We believe in the importance of the APTA Guide to Physical Therapy Practice, the APTA Code of Ethics and the APTA Guide for Professional Conduct and use these documents throughout our curriculum. 
  • We believe in the APTA Normative Model for Physical Therapist Professional Education State practice acts and we support the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education and the Evaluative Criteria for Educational Programs for Preparation of Physical Therapists.  
  • We believe that Physical Therapists should uphold the scientific foundations of the practice of physical therapy and the ethical principles of the profession. 
  • We believe that Physical Therapists should lead by example in the areas of health, wellness, and prevention by being active participants in the community.
  • We believe in respect for the values of others and the development of critical thinking and moral decision-making.
  • We believe in respect for individual and cultural differences and we encourage understanding the culture of individuals and groups. 
  • We believe in the creation of a learning environment that fosters reflective thinking, life-long learning and intellectual curiosity.

 

Physical Therapy Videos
Meet alumna Karlyn Dauplaise (M.S., physical therapy, ’06) a physical therapist at Florida Hospital in Orlando.

STUDENT OUTCOMES

Graduation Rate

The graduation rate of students over the past three cohorts of DPT students who began the program (Class of 2011, 2012, 2013) is 93%.

Licensure Pass Rate – All of the graduating students (100%) of the Class of 2011, 2012, and 2013 passed the national physical therapy licensure examination.  The first attempt pass rates of these three classes averaged 94%, with an overall pass rate of 100%. Please see the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy, www.fsbpt.org, for further details.

Employment Rate – All of the graduating students (100%) of the Class of 2011, 2012, and 2013 were employed within six months after passing the licensure examination.

PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

According to numerous national reporting agencies, the job outlook for competent physical therapists should remain strong well into the 2lst century.

Although physical therapists may work in hospitals or medical centers, more than 70% are employed in rehab centers, sports facilities, home health settings, pediatric facilities, research institutions, nursing centers and many other large corporations. In addition, physical therapists may be employees or serve as owners or partners in private practice settings.

For further information on training, other qualifications, employment, job outlook, earnings and other sources, visit http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Healthcare/Physical-therapists.htm

According toa recent article in Yahoo! Financials, physical therapy is one of the fastest growing fields in the country today. Here are the facts:

Median pay: $75,900
Top pay: $97,800
10-year job growth: 30%
Total jobs: 190,000

The job: Health care is a booming field, and the demand for physical therapists is increasing apace. You'll need to go back to school to learn the techniques for increasing patient mobility and decreasing pain, but the two- to three-year graduate program is still far shorter than the time it takes to become a doctor. You can do a nursing degree in that time, but pay and satisfaction are better for PTs.

How to switch: You'll need a master's or the increasingly common three-year doctorate. Learn more at apta.org.

Quality of life ratings:
Personal satisfaction: A
Benefit to society: A
Low stress: C
Flexibility: B

 

HOW TO APPLY TO THE PROGRAM

For up-to-date information on applying to the UCF DPT program, please visit the Admissions section of this website.

CONTACT US

Patrick S. Pabian, PT, DPT, SCS, OCS, CSCS
Program Director,

Clinical Associate Professor
HPA I- 256
Phone: 407-823-3470

Samantha Moya, M.Ed.
Coordinator of Academic Support & Services
HPA I - 261
E-mail: samantha.moya@ucf.edu

*Contact Samantha for admissions inquiries